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TAS 7000
Education & Careers

The Issue

While many people find it difficult to obtain legal information and assistance, young people are particularly vulnerable when it comes to dealings with police and the justice system. This is because they haven't been taught about what their rights and responsibilities under the criminal law are. This is partly because schools and other institutions don't teach you and also because it's worded in such a complicated, difficult to engage with way. COMET aims to reduce the stigma and misinformation about the law and demystify the processes that are involved. In a nutshell, we want to make really important information about what you can and cannot do to other people, and Vice Versa, easier to access.

The Response

COMET empowers disadvantaged young people to understand key concepts of criminal law and use that to make informed choices about their lives.

Recognising that knowledge engenders power, COMET provides targeted and structured education sessions for youth at risk of homelessness. Don't let the "structured education" fool you: it's engaging and fun. Our sessions aren't run like a classroom or a presentation. They are interactive, fun, story-driven experiences that help young people actually see the purpose of the law and the ethics underneath it. Using emotion, strategic questioning and genuine connection between participants and facilitators, the sessions break down teacher-learner barriers to create a space where young people want to know more about the law and how it can affect them.

Covering topics including assault, sexual offences, police powers and stealing, COMET aims to reduce the stigma and misinformation about the law and demystify the processes that are involved. In a nutshell, we want to make really important information about what you can and cannot do to other people, and Vice Versa, easier to access.

COMET is a youth-led initiative run on a volunteer basis by University of Tasmania penultimate and final year law students.

In order to ensure the quality of the program, two measures are taken. Firstly, the volunteers receive advanced facilitation training, by professonal facilitators. This allows them to maintain a safe and open environment where questions and views can be expressed without judgement. In this way, COMET workshops can operate as a two-way discussion and mutual learning opportunity which engages the volunteers and participants alike. Secondly, all content delivered is based on the current, accepted law and vetted by the University of Tasmania Law Faculty for accuracy and appropriateness.

Created by Andrew